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EXCELLENT....TRULY EXCELLENT!
Your book exuded emotion ... It is so poignant, expressed with warmth ...
And very, very intelligently.
Brilliantly told in first case.  One felt "with Libby" throughout.
A lot of your sources you had at your finger tips through family, family friends and introductions...but your "live"descriptions of personal interludes, social gatherings and descriptions of places and times are incredible.  You have a natural intelligence which lends itself to your writing ... Beautiful English...which is often not "available" to most writers.

EPS Curtis, Richmond, Surrey, England

BONJOUR PARIS
Bonjour Paris, is a web site devoted to Paris and France from the top insiders in Paris. They recently reviewed my book A CRUEL CALM, Paris Between the Wars. Read their review here.

Book Review by Jane del Monte for BONJOUR PARIS.
She lived for a number of years in Paris and is the owner of
ARTS in PARIS
, specializing in personalized tours
that focus on French culture and l’art de vivre.

    I am half-way through your book, and I am mesmerized by your storytelling skills. I like the way you go back and forth in time so effortlessly. The only person I remembered to do it so well was Aldous Huxley. (Brave New World, I believe. Also,  the Island, he used some extraordinary techniques in that book as well.) It is always a joy to read a pro’s writing.

Joe David, Author.

Review of A CRUEL CALM - By the Historical Novel Society

    This well researched novel covers the years 1927-1939, a time when Paris was the cultural center of the world. Paris, still recovering from the ravages of the First World War, faces the growing shadow of the next “great war.” Young, naïve, American socialite, Libby Whitacker, moves to Paris with her new husband during this period of artistic, technological, and cultural dynamism. Libby witnesses Charles Lindbergh as he makes the first transatlantic flight in 1927, and she meets and gets guidance from James Joyce, who lives in the same apartment building as she does. As Libby moves in the circles of high society, she also meets Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, and Joseph Campbell among others. However, the heart of the story is how Libby deals with the reality that her husband is not who she thinks he is.
    Patricia Daly-Lipe does an excellent job of including accurate historical details that enhance the story. Additionally, we learn about the artists and their works through the clever use of their own words. The novel also shows how, despite all the changes in the larger society, the Catholic Church refuses to deviate from tradition. The church’s refusal to adapt has terrible consequences for the heroine.
    The book does a good job of capturing the spirit of the time—an age when everything seemed possible as a result of the pace of technological change. The combination of historical detail and poignant romance make this novel well worthwhile. The author should also be commended for the creative way she introduces historical figures into the novel. Anyone who is interested in learning about the time in history between the two world wars should read this novel.

Historical Novel Society

Review of A CRUEL CALM

    The book is very well-written, very literate and understandable. The quotations which begin each chapter are an interesting way to encourage the reader to think about what is really meant...
    The reader is quickly engaged in Libby’s life, which is the continuous theme of the book, with both active and passive parts, with physical actions and introspective exploration. Libby’s growth into an assertive woman with her own values, desires, and real or perceived triumphs and failures, render Libby very human.
    It is natural for Libby to wonder about her life, what she should do, what she is capable of doing, and what her life means. Libby’s mind and emotions seem to be in neutral before her marriage to Michael, after which her mind and emotions seem to switch to high gear. Libby was not prepared to be a wife or an independent adult, with her role model, her Mother, appearing to be totally subservient to Libby’s Father. Libby did not seem to want to marry Michael and was incredulous that Michael wanted to marry her.....
   Libby was enamored with the mid-to-late 1920’s culture in Paris, with numerous writers, painters and philosophers trying to answer unanswerable, age-old questions such as “what does life mean?’ and “who am I?” and “why am I here?” Libby was not an artist, but was the perfect audience because she tried to understand and learned to appreciate so much in so many fields, and her world kept expanding. Being in Paris in the 1920’s seemed to be Libby’s destiny so that she could become a more fulfilled woman, which would have been highly unlikely had Libby remained in Washington.
   ...The historical insertions, such as Lindbergh and, much later, Earhart, work because they provide context to the times and the idea that anything is possible.
    I was very interested in Libby’s growth and where life would take her, and where she would take life. Without ever knowing anyone similar to Libby, I liked Libby because she cared and tried.

Roy J. Bucholtz, Esq.

    I bought your book A Cruel Calm at the Virginia Writer’s Club meeting in November, but only now got around to reading it. I am very impressed! You should sell a million of them!
    Patricia Daly-Lipe is a multi-talented novelist who also paints, raises horses and children. She has a bachelor’s degree in philosophy and a PhD in Creative Arts and Communication. This is her fourth book, based on the life of her mother during the period stated.

The Story

    The story is about Libby Perry, daughter of a wealthy American banker, a writer, naïve wife to a homosexual aviation buff, lover to a French aristocrat, lover and wife to an American aristocrat, mother of one. Libby is naïve, but lovely, smart, well-educated and curious. She married an American man and experienced her first kiss at the wedding. She never consummated the marriage for she soon discovered her husband in a compromising position with another man. He would not divorce her. Being Catholic, she could not get out of the marriage; and she could not bear to be with the man who disappointed her so.
    The Perry’s had good connections everywhere, including Paris, and the young couple, Libby and Michael Whitacker, set up an apartment in Paris, apparently funded by Libby’s father. Even as Michael pursued his passion for aviation, and other men, a friend, Philippe, pursued Libby. Finally, she had an affair with Philippe, and tried desperately to find help in securing a marriage annulment so the two could live happily ever after. Along the way, Libby met many important people in Paris: James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Gertrude Stein, etc., some of whom made lasting impressions on Libby’s intellect and social conscience.
    The story to a great extent extols the enlightened elite of Paris and the art that was their lives. Throughout, Libby found that the ideals of her youth could not be maintained; they did not supply love, romance, adventure, gender equality, or professional opportunity. It is a story of love and pain; of idealism tempered by practical necessity; of growing up; of discovering and embracing adulthood.

Don Collier

  "A Cruel Calm has been reviewed and recommended by Story Circle Book Reviews and by Historical Novel Society. You can find further information online at http://historicalnovelsociety.org/hnr-online.htm.
  This well researched novel covers the years 1927-1939, a time when Paris was the cultural center of the world. Paris, still recovering from the ravages of the First World War, faces the growing shadow of the next “great war.” Young, naïve, American socialite, Libby Whitacker, moves to Paris with her new husband during this period of artistic, technological, and cultural dynamism. Libby witnesses Charles Lindbergh as he makes the first transatlantic flight in 1927, and she meets and gets guidance from James Joyce, who lives in the same apartment building as she does. As Libby moves in the circles of high society, she also meets Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, and Joseph Campbell among others. However, the heart of the story is how Libby deals with the reality that her husband is not who she thinks he is.
    "Patricia Daly-Lipe does an excellent job of including accurate historical details that enhance the story. Additionally, we learn about the artists and their works through the clever use of their own words. The novel also shows how, despite all the changes in the larger society, the Catholic Church refuses to deviate from tradition. The church’s refusal to adapt has terrible consequences for the heroine.
    "The book does a good job of capturing the spirit of the time—an age when everything seemed possible as a result of the pace of technological change. The combination of historical detail and poignant romance make this novel well worthwhile. The author should also be commended for the creative way she introduces historical figures into the novel. Anyone who is interested in learning about the time in history between the two world wars should read this novel."

Gerard Shea
Historical Novel Society

“Patricia Daly-Lipe is an inspired writer with a flair for incorporating well researched historical facts with fiction. Her book, A Cruel Calm: Paris Between the Wars is an enchanting romp through the streets of the City of Lights with flamboyant well developed characters during the most creative and artistic periods in the 20th century. Buy the book and bon voyage!

Cynthia Brian, New York Times best selling author,
TV/Radio personality/ Founder, Be the Star You Are!® charity,
www.CynthiaBrian.com
, www.StarstyleRadio.com, www.BetheSTARyouAre.org


  I got such a strong feeling of Paris between the wars, and I had no idea the effect of Lindbergh's flight. You gave such a great description of the people waiting and making him a hero. The excitement you captured will stay with me. You depicted the period of the novel so realistically.
  Libby's journey was fascinating. From innocent girl to worldly woman.The discovery of her husband was shocking in the way you wrote it and one could feel Libby's pain.Her meeting so many great people of the time was fascinating. And Joyce told her to go forth and love. What a good message.  I read with enjoyment her love affair with Philippe and routed for them to be together. But life is not that simple with its cruelties.
&  In admiration,

Bebe Willoughby, children book author (SAVING EMMA)
and former children’s book editor (Random House and Simon & Schuster).


In A CRUEL CALM, Paris Between the Wars, author Patricia Daly-Lipe tells the often-steamy story of a young Washington socialite who leaves for a Paris honeymoon, concerned about the man she has just married, never suspecting what lies ahead.
  Daly-Lipe’s book takes you to the Paris of that time: Lindbergh’s arrival at Le Bourget after his historic flight, the Surrealist movement, and writers such as Hemingway, Gertrude Stein, James Joyce and others, quoted in their actual words thanks to her painstaking research.
  The tale, which has won two awards for excellence, cites the mores of that period, and the scorn awaiting those who dared to break the rules for love. The story takes many unexpected turns. But probably the greatest surprise is that the heroine is Daly-Lipe’s own mother. Daly-Lipe based this account on old family records and travels to near-forgotten sites.

Donna Shor (Donna Shor writes the "Around Town" column for Washington Life.
She has written for the Washington Times and the Alexandria Times.
Her career as a journalist began during a twenty-year stay in Europe,
when she wrote feature stories for the Paris-based International Herald Tribune)

  Awesome, awesome book! It kept me up all night! This story, reminiscent of a bygone era, teases the senses into visualizing its aroma, experiencing its texture and personifying the people. It grips you, and brings you to their present day and time. Not a love story just, but a poignant picture of humanity.

Trish Wootten, writer,
Representative of the Academic Foundation for International Cultural Exchange
and President National League of American PEN Women, DC Branch

  This is not what you might expect for a review but, it's words and thoughts that come from a little boy growing up in South Georgia wondering just how far it might be to France and those other countries which have to be way up above Atlanta, Georgia.
  I will admit that all my life I have never read many books just for fun. But I have written many published stories that I shared with thousands of readers for entertainment and enjoyment.
  So when I read your book many folks including our publisher lay bets that I would never make it through your book.
  So pay up folks, this gal knows how to write and hold me from cover to cover. I learned one hell of a lot reading Pat's lines she shared with me, and was hooked from the beginning. It is true to life and quite an education.... I really enjoyed A CRUEL CALM. You created a wonderful work of art. It's very obvious that as a writer you, like me wrote this book speaking from your heart. Please write another one, maybe a sequel.

W. Everett Beal, Rph,
author, Southern Winds and Fatal Addiction

  Thank you for sending a copy of your most recent novel. I was delighted to receive it. As soon as I was able to set aside a moment to get started, I was captivated and could not put it down until I had read it cover to cover in two all-night sessions. It reads easily, there are parts that are definitively racy – I liked them as they suddenly appeared. I marvel at your grasp of post World-War I France, and the atmosphere you achieve with “the word.” Congratulations! The novel is well done!

Dr. Donald Fraser, Nova Scotia - Toronto

  "Je suis à Paris à ce moment. A very enjoyable experience. The story has substance and sensitivity."

Diane Noble

  This Book could be classified as "fictionalized nonfiction" according to some of its promotion literature and reviews. It is one of four produced by the author. The other three are Myth, Magic & Metaphor, A Journey into the Heart of Creativity, La Jolla, A Celebration of its Past and Messages from Nature (Nature's Wisdom), A collection of Short Stories and Poems.
   A CRUEL CALM has earned Patricia The Amazon 5-Star Award. As one reviewer wrote, the book is not only a love story, but also "works out its story line…brings to life a society and a culture that would otherwise be hauntingly unfamiliar to today's readers."
   The author spices up the story with "side trips" to discover the history of aviation, the American "exile" community in Paris, modern art, Hannibal, and the Catholic church—and with such characters from life as Charles Lindbergh, James Joyce and Gertrude Stein.
   As still another reviewer said, she liked the quotes at the beginnings of chapters—for example, from Ulysses by James Joyce, "History…is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake." Equally fascinating are quotations submerged in the text as well as bits and pieces of the author's poetry. No question; this book is carefully researched and well-written, whether you classify it as fiction or fact.

Reviewed by Barbara Bell Matuszewski, Vero Beach Branch, NLAPW
for The Pen Woman a publication of the National League of American Pen Woman, Inc.

  "Better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all—well, yes and no. Read A CRUEL CALM view of this age old dilemma.”

Rita Mae Brown, Author of eleven novels, poet and two-time Emmy nominee.

  Patricia Daly-Lipe has written a fascinating and compelling account of life in Paris between the two world wars from the point of view of a young and inexperienced Catholic woman. She has obviously researched her subject extensively, and deftly weaves social norms, glimpses of cultural giants, both literary and artistic, of the period as well as a look at history. She combines with this a moving love story and a delightful tour of the city, as well as other locations in France. You will feel you are there!

Kay Pfaltz, Author of Lauren's Story: An-American Dog in Paris

  "Congratulations! This is superb work. I appreciate the quality, the substance, and the style. Very well done.”

Dr. M. P. Cosman, Esq.
Dr. Cosman died March 2006. She was an attorney known for work in Medical Law. She was President of Medical Equity, Inc., a national medical and law practice brokerage located in San Diego
One of her 14 published books was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award and was a
Book of the Month Club Dividend Selection. From 1989 through 1993, she was
Associate Editor of National Trial Lawyer. But her most popular book is Fabulous Feasts:
Medieval Cookery and Ceremony
(George Braziller, 1976, New York), still in print in
several languages including Japanese. Her Medieval WordBook (1996) sells as a Quality Paperback

AMAZON 5 STAR AWARD  
  On the surface, "Forbidden Loves" (1st edition) is a romantic "coming of age" novel about love, loss, and redemption It throws in a surprising ending to boot. But it's not "just" a love story. As the novel works out its story line, it brings to life a society and a culture that would otherwise be hauntingly unfamiliar to today's readers.
  Daly-Lipe spices up her story with side trips to such diverse areas as the history of aviation. the American exile community in Paris, modern art, Hannibal, and the Catholic church. The diverse characters include Charles Lindbergh, James Joyce, and Gertrude Stein--and each of them belongs in the story.
  I don't want to give away the plot of "Forbidden Loves." It takes many unexpected twists before it arrives at the ultimate twist at its end. The story is worth reading without anticipating anything but surprises.
  This is not the type of book I normally read, Nevertheless, I enjoyed it enormously.

Robert Goodman, Founder San Diego Publishers Alliance, San Diego, CA

Dear Ms. Daly-Lipe:
  Thank you so much for your nice letter and for your wonderful book on Paris between the wars. I really appreciated it and your endeavor to search for the places and the facts of your mother's life in Paris and make a great book of it is admirable and impressive.
  I wish your book a great success.

Sincerely,
Jean-David Levitte
A Letter from the Ambassade de France aux Etats-Unis
Dated Washington, April 20, 2005

  A great read. A rare inside glimpse of a remarkablle era: Paris between the wars. A love story with many turns and unexpected twists, told within the context of the Paris that will never return again - The Paris of giants like Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzggerald, James Joyce and Gertrude Stein. The Paris that was the cultural capital of the West, where idealism, innovatrion, experimentation and taboos reigned. I recommend it highly to romantic buffs, historical buffs and avid readers in general.

Michael O. Schwager, Ft. Lauderdale, FL

 "I just finished your book Forbidden Loves, Paris Between the Wars and truly enjoyed it. The history, the love story, everything. You write beautifully. I felt like I was there and being of Catholic faith, I felt so sorry for her (the protagonist). And the ending broke my heart. (X) is my 2nd husband and I wanted to annul my marriage and so did he and in 1990, I went to my priest and yes, it could be done, but to the tune of $5,000.00 for both of ours to be annulled. And so we said no, we didn't have that kind of cash lying around and so we were not married in the Church and today 14 years later, it still hurts."

From Linda, another reader (last name withheld at her request)

  Hi, I finished your book. You're an excellent writer! The romance was heart wrenching, but I can't see it end any other way. Your mother couldn't have gone back to France and stayed there during the war, and I can't see Philippe being happy in the U.S. So it has to end this way.
  I'm so glad that you got recognition for the great book that this is. It's a classic, with a personal story enacted against a rich tapestry of history, philosophy and culture. I thoroughly enjoyed it.

Veronica Li author of
Journey across the Four Seas: A Chineese Woman's Search for Home and
Nightfall in Mogadishu

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Reading Myth, Magic, and Metaphor was like sitting down for a free-associative conversation with a dear, bright friend.  I love the way you see connections between philosophers and writers separated by centuries and continents.  I find few people can keep up with that kind of non-linear thinking, and it was a joy to find you!'

Barbara Amster

 

I was just telling some friends recently that your Creative Writing classes back in 1995-96 at Maryland Hall spurred (I thought you'd like the horsey verb!) me to reconnect with my creative spirit - and I've continued writing with gusto these past 20 years! Thanks so much for your remarkable inspiration!!! You were my catalyst!

Shirley Brewer

 

Excerpt from la Joie book review
Click here for full review

Myth, Magic, and Metaphor is a book for everyone. For those who love and care for animals, nature and the Earth, there is encouragement of your deeply intuitive feelings. For those who also choose or feel compelled to write of their feelings, to honor those who have graced their lives, this is an invaluable manual and companion to the craft of such expression. Or if you just want a great book to inspire and delight you—this is the one. Dr. Patricia Daly-Lipe is friend to us all, whether or not you have had the great pleasure of personally knowing her. As one who honors others' lives, both of the human and animal kind, she not only offers a gift with her writings (and paintings) but does the hard day-to-day efforts of working with rescued animals. Her heart is right on the task and over the years, many have benefited from her dedication.

La Joie is a quarterly publication dedicated to
promoting appreciation for all beings through education, adoption/sponsorship, and inter-support programs.
Blessing the Bridge - Animal Peace Garden

            READER'S FAVORITE REVIEW
                 RATED    4 STARS

    The goal is to become intoxicated with life. The tool is the heart. The medium is words.” Writing, as Dr. Patricia Daly-Lipe illustrates time and again in her book Myth, Magic, and Metaphor: A Journey into the Heart of Creativity, is a combination of intuition, desire, and open-mindedness mixed with hard work, long hours, and a solid foundation. Dr. Daly-Lipe presents a solid foundation for creative writing students to start their journeys into writing and any aspiring or veteran writer to use as a springboard for his or her next book. Each chapter provides an opportunity to explore how creativity comes about from inspiration, which feeds the process of writing (the focus here) and any artistic endeavor. From using a word’s etymology to fuel its power to tapping into the rhythmic beat of Mozart, “[w]riting is a way of introducing wonder and surprise to ourselves.” Creativity requires – if not outright demands – that you slow to a halt and let everyone else race past while you take in the sights. Once you have your fill of everything around you, find a way to translate your experiences from your mind and your heart into something people wouldn’t mind slowing down to get more of. Writing is only one of many, and Dr. Daly-Lipe is more than happy to help.
    I feel Myth, Magic, and Metaphor is best utilized as a textbook for college and possibly high school students attending creative writing courses. Dr. Daly-Lipe fills the book with lots of quotes from a wide range of influential people, including authors, philosophers, poets, Nobel Prize winners, and musicians. She goes in depth into how words have power, whether that power is for good or for bad, and how those words can give sentences life by the way they are placed together. She argues that an artist being idle is not the same as being lazy; for the artist to be inspired to create and encourage the imagination (both of which are intrinsic to creativity), the artist must be able to relax his or her body and mind deeply to let the images/words come to the forefront. Once in the forefront, the artist will likely feel compelled to express these images/words in the physical world through stories, paintings, or even dance. The sources of inspiration are present all around us – we need to be more childlike in viewing the world, the environment, and ourselves. This can be quite difficult in this fast-paced world, but I believe that makes creativity and being creative so appealing. Many want more creativity for their jobs or careers; out of that many, few will find that creativity extends much further than those confines. Creativity is not creative unless it starts from deep within the creator and reaches out (by way of a medium) to touch another person, inspiring him or her to be a creator as well. Myth, Magic, and Metaphor is Dr. Daly-Lipe’s way of inspiring others to be creators within their own right through the medium of words.

Reviewed by Ayrial King for Readers' Favorite

    One usually remembers creative people for their productivity, not for their thoughts on the origin or the process which leads to their resulting achievement. In this book, the authoress explores what creativity means to musicians, historians, artists, poets, philosophers, scientists, and even mathematicians through the medium of their own words.
    Each chapter begins with a topical quotation. These introductory words match the chapter title and set the tone for the chapter's content, whether it be art, myth, magic, or music.
    Ms. Daly-Lipe lures the reader in with thoughts on creativity as expressed by the likes of Aristotle, Carl Jung, Albert Einstein, Toni Morrison, and Joseph Campbell (to name but a few). Her real purpose appears to be to draw us into the writing process. Each chapter is interspersed with words of encouragement such as "Write the way you perceive and the way you feel"(p. 72) or "Write about what you see but also write about what you cannot see" (p. 143) or "Don't question whether to write and don't procrastinate doing it." (p. 158)
   Each chapter also gently concludes with an assignment for those of us who need structure to get us writing: "Your assignment is to slow down." (p. 39)(Ch. 2) or "Let yourself tell you more about your self." (p. 81) (Ch. 6). Ms. Daly-Lipe urges us to read all sorts of authors, not just current best sellers; to listen to Mozart and Bach for rhythms; to study science and language for insights into the magic of symbols.
   This slender tome is a handbook for creative writing whether for the individual looking for a different perspective on the craft or for the student needing to find references for a writing class.
   To quote Phyllis Whitney, as the authoress does at the beginning and end of her book, "...think with a pencil." I say read this book, take up your pencil, and write.

A. L.

13 Oct 2011
    Your book has touched my soul and stoked the artist in me.
    For the last year, I've been working on a book of letters, and inspiration can be tough.  I've found myself attaching my creative source to many unreliable things versus allowing myself to feel and let go of what's famililar and safe. Your book has provided such validation and guidance that I truly believe that I'm on my way to realizing a dream -- to fulfill my purpose.
    Our meeting was not by chance. Your words, as well as the collection of sentiment you gathered, have moved something deep within me and confirmed a mission that I know must be completed. I feel blessed.
    If you are planning any more creative writing seminars or will be speaking somewhere soon or in the future, please do let me know. I'd be honored to speak with you again and personally thank you for mentoring me through this wonderful and terrifying creative process.

Alexis Holmes

Creativity: A Journey to the Source

    Almost all writers experience an interruption to the flow of creativity from time to time. On January 12, artist and writer Patricia Daly-Lipe shared her beliefs about creativity, where it originates and how to connect with our source.
    As a former student of philosophy, Daly-Lipe has plenty of experience living the examined life. She believes that the journey to creativity involves the process, not the final product....
    Daly-Lipe specifically urges writers to allow the words to flow until they take over and time stops....
    To connect to the source of creativity, we also need to see the world in a new way. Daly-Lipe advises writers to allow the world to reveal itself. The word reveal originally meant “remove veil”. When in the act of observing, we need to peel back the layers in order to find the truth.
    According to Daly-Lipe, we are part of nature and the universe is within us. As artists, we have an innate ability to perceive the beauty of the world. Daly-Lipe urges us to take the time to look around. Return to the state of child-like excitement when we learned something new. “The sunset is always there, but really take the time to enjoy it. Look for the extraordinary in the ordinary,” says Daly-Lipe. At one point in the evening, she shared this memorable quote: “The world will never starve for want of wonders, but want of wonder.”
    Most importantly, we should create some record of our lives. Daly-Lipe’s book La Jolla, A Celebration of Its Past is a collection of essays and vignettes that describe history from the point of view of the people who settled there. Daly-Lipe laments that people write few letters today. E-mail is the primary means of communication and messages are usually deleted. She urges us to save e-mails and to keep journals in order to pass on something of ourselves.
    ...Daly-Lipe also reminded us that creativity does not need a purpose. The process should be reward enough. Allow spontaneity to express itself and live in the moment.

Danielle Ring, WIW Member (Washington Independent Writers)

   According to San Diego’s own verbivore and commentator of KPBS”s ‘A Way With Words’, Richard Lederer“Myth, Magic, & Metaphor is luminous with oracular wisdom about the nature and sources of creativity.  From first page to last, this book will inspire you to be inspired.” The book was composed to do just that: inspire. It is not to teach or to substantiate a bias. It was written as a jumping off point for the reader to become the writer using etymology, mathematics, painting, music, philosophy, even psychology as some of the concepts for stimulation. As Joseph Campbell stated, 'The privilege of a lifetime is being who you are." Nothing more is requested of the reader. Take away the rules. Listen to your heart. That is where you will find the source; in this case, the source of creativity.

Richard Lederer, author, lecturer, and co-host for KPBS radio

  I read, reread and reread MM&M as there is an abundance of enriching material in it. It takes me to a different plane of experience.

C. Cook

  For me, this was a delightful and refreshing book to read. I found myself underlining and asterisking numerous phrases throughout the book to refer to again and again. I would highly recommend it to anyone involved in or interested in the creative arts.

Jane Best, Morgantown, NC

  I read MM&M in one sitting on a bench in Union Square Park, completely engrossed, and unaware of the lunatic babbling of Park denizens. An embarrassment of riches, to say the least. I really enjoyed your ranging mind, and the manifold use of citations and poetic snippets. You are a quintessential humanist. And best of all, you helped unblock me from non-writing.

Joseph Roccasalvo, S.J. author of seven novels including Portrait of A Woman,
Chartreuse, and The Odor of Sanctity plus two plays so far.

  For anyone looking for their creativity button this small, dynamic book is a must read. Ms. Daly leads the reader through an understandable path to finding your creative juices without wandering too far off the journey to finding your writing powers.
     With the many exercises she includes within the chapters it makes this 107 page book even more valuable.  I found this journey to writing can also be applied to other arts that the reader may be interested in pursuing.

Pamela Binder, Bay City, MI

  I have loved reading Myth, Magic and Metaphor. Like a mocingbird sucks nectar; it’s been food for my soul fueling my creative process. Thank you for the gift of it.
  There is so much magic in life, and it’s joyful to witness synchronicities dancing many moments of the day. Your book tapped that mythical connected place, and I feel close to you as the author, as if we have had a close conversation for many hours.
  …I completed my BA at UCSD doing a special projects major entitled “Symbol, Ritual and Transformation” that dealt with my near-death experience through fine art. I have taught hundreds of creativity courses in the years following my BA, as well as developing a private practice integrating psychology, creativity and spirituality. (My PhD dissertation was entitled “Art and Soul: Creative Process as Spiritual Path”, I’d like to turn it into a book-sound familiar?) Our teaching philosophy is very similar. Now, after 20 years of supporting other people in their journey, I am taking a year long sabbatical to do my own creative work of writing and painting full time. Yeah! So your book landed into my hands in perfect timing.
  In my daily writing this morning, a rain of tears came down my face when I wrote about aching to share more of myself with the world in my writing and art. Your book encourages me. It was fun to discover through your web site that you are a painter as well…

Lisa Longworth, Director of the Expressive Art Therapy Department
of International University of Professional Studies

   I can fly! Although I purchased this book for my daughter to share with high school students in her English and creative writing classes, I decided to read it myself before sending it. What a great decision! I read it like a novel, thereby receiving the full impact of the encouragement and excitement being created within me as I turned the pages quickly. Before I had completed the book, I was totally inspired with renewed confidence to practice being creative in ALL areas of my life, not just in my writing. I moved things around my home with abandon, made new desserts with a flourish, and even dared to tie a scarf around my neck and go out in public! All of these things were great FUN! I may never write a novel, but this book has surely inspired me to use my creative spirit as I spice up my life. I thank you, Patty Daly-Lipe for that, and I truly believe this must have been the reason you wrote this book!

A reviewer, Bed & Breakfast owner, March 3, 2004,

   I found this book to be a great source to get the creative juices flowing in ones mind. It isn't a 'how to' book. I believe another reviewer simply didn't understand the authors intention. It is a great upper for anyone feeling a lag in creativity when writing.

Ben, A reviewer, March 1, 2004.

  In the Fall, 2004 issue of laJoie Magazine, (laJoie and Company, P. O. Box 145, Batesville, VA 22924 (540)456-6204, publisher Rita Reynolds has written a lovely “Tribute” to me and to my book, Myth, Magic & Metaphor. I am humbled by such praise. She speaks of my having “a strong sense of compassion, intelligence, creativity, and selflessness.” But it is to the readers of my books that the best tribute comes. “…Myth, Magic & Metaphoris one of those little books that is pure treasure, the needed lift when the spirit is weary.” She then quotes from the book: “More than ever, I feel, three aspects of the human psyche need to be developed, namely: imagination, inspiration, and creativity.... For the artist, there is clarity and an order in the beauty of nature. Our participation in and with nature allows us to recognize that fact. The universe is truly both within us and without/outside us. There is nothing new in this world that is not old. All this, the artist observes and records.”
  Thank you Rita for writing “Standing Tall: A Tribute”. For my web readers, please look at Rita’s book,Crossing the Bridge, What Animals Have to Teach Us About Death, Dying and Beyond and check out her web site. Also, I encourage you to look at her son, Tim’s, beautiful art work,portraits of pets:

Patricia Daly-Lipe, author

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"When it comes to doing things for others,
some people stop at nothing."

    These words are not just a frequent aphorism of Helen Holt. They are a true reflection of her 23 dedicated years as a public servant. Holt's list of accolades is nothing less than remarkable. Yet the 101-year-old icon and first woman to hold a statewide-office in West Virginia is not at all shy to admit that she became "a professional woman by necessity."
    Author Patricia Daly-Lipe presents a woman who unwittingly becomes a trailblazer for women in the political arena. The real irony is that Holt never gives politics a second thought until she marries the youngest U.S. senator (1935-1941) from West Virginia, Rush D. Holt, Jr. in 1941. Holt immediately gets involved in her husband's work, and Rush is quick to teach Holt "how to work with men and to feel comfortable working with them," since she is a lone woman in a man's world. That is only the beginning.
    Daly-Lipe takes readers behind the scenes to their home life. Deeply in love, Holt and her husband are blessed with a boy and a girl. But amid many joyful moments, their short-lived marriage is filled with trials and tribulations. Tragedy strikes with the sudden death of Rush's sister, leaving the responsibility of raising her son to her brother and sister-in-law. Aside from adjustments, their nephew is a welcomed addition to the Holts' growing family. Yet more problems ensue as Rush has bouts with the cancer that eventually leads to his untimely death in 1955.
    Daly-Lipe clearly portrays Holt's overwhelming conundrum as she is left to raise three children with absolutely no income; pension is granted only to public officers 50 years of age and over. Rush was 49 at the time of his death. Yet in an amazing turn of events, Holt is able to provide for her family when she takes over Rush's position in the West Virginia House of Delegates. A pay increase comes two years later when Holt is sworn in as Secretary of State of West Virginia. President Eisenhower commissions her in 1960 with "the task of creating a program to fix the nation's ailing network of nursing homes" because, as Holt puts it, "they had to get a woman—no man was sufficiently interested." Holt tirelessly carries out this job over the course of seven consecutive presidents of the United States.
    The American people owe much to Holt for her marvelous example of leadership and for her diligence in developing the Assisted Living/Nursing Care programs and homes that are in existence today. Many kudos to Daly-Lipe for conveying the powerful essence of Helen Holt in this Memoir of a Servant Leader.

Anita Lock
for Story Circle Book Reviews
reviewing books by, for, and about women

Not just a biography - A History Book!

    I met Mrs. Holt at the retirement community where my father lives. She is a remarkable woman at 101 years young! When I learned that this book had recently been published, I had to order it. Mrs. Holt opened many doors for women - hopefully, we will never forget her!

Lori Kreafle on April 29, 2015

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   I read your encomium to your uncle and enjoyed it immensely. An extraordinary amount of thought and research went into the biography to make it a proverbial page-turner. What a Mensch! Patrician elegance, a faithful friend, an astute mind, unwavering courage, deeply engaged in the momentous events of two world wars with Popes, Princes, and Diplomats--the list goes on and on. How lovely to know you share the same accomplished gene pool.
Thank you for sending it to me; more importantly, thank you for caring enough to write it. I was more than impressed; I was agog at your shrewd interweaving of headlines with biography. 

Bene scripsisti in saecula saeculorum (you have written well for the ages).

Joseph Roccasalvo, S. J.
Teaches Comparative Religion and Buddhist Studies
at Fordham University, Lincoln Center.
He is a standing member of the Center for
the Study of World Religions, Harvard,
and holds a Ph.D. from that University.
A Catholic priest.

    This true story of an extraordinary American, Msgr. William A. Hemmick, is a journey through the 20th century history of Europe.  As a Catholic priest, Msgr. Hemmick served the soldiers in the front lines of WWI.  Post- WW I, Msgr. Hemmick remained in Europe through the turbulent 1920s and 1930s and through the turmoil of WW II in Italy.  A cosmopolitan man, Msgr. Hemmick traveled widely and befriended kings, popes and celebrities. This book is a worthwhile read for both history buffs and those interested in the Catholic Church during this critical period.

Lucy Russell

    Patricia Daly-Lipe puts us back in time to 1916, where we are caught up in the bloody, unrelenting trench warfare of World War I. The PATRIOT PRIEST is the true story of her great uncle, a Catholic priest who lived through the nightmare of a war that couldn't be won or lost, but had to be endured. His steadfast sense of duty in the face of death and destruction is especially moving to us today, as we try and make sense of the endless wars that rage around us, and the inevitable moral question of whether we should "get involved."

Donna Evers, Consulting writer, The Georgetowner

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5 Stars Amazon Rating 4 Reviews

    This is a heart-warming book about love, the love for animals and nature. It makes us feel we're a part of Nature, not apart from it. Every story in the book exudes with the author's love for her dogs and horses, and the wildlife and natural phenomena she encounters on voyages and hikes in forests. The episodes are full of magical moments that give glimpses into the connection between man and nature. The author's passion is inspiring. I feel like running out to the pound and adopting an animal.

 Veronica Li

    Patricia Daly-Lipe's adventuraous and loving nature shines in "Messages from Nature." A former newspaperwoman who holds a Ph.D in Creative Arts and Comunications, she showcases her considerable literary talents in a well-written and appealing melange of animal and nautical tales. Who couldn't help loving Woodstock, the stray pup who becomes a jaunty sailor? Or Just'n, the thoroughbred horse Pat saved just in time, before the poor animal starved? Then, in one of the most moving stories of all, she recounts her father's sad tale of Jerry Too, the greyhound who loved his young owner so much he'd die rather than let him down. This is the stuff anumal lovers and other readers adore.
    But she doesn't stop there. Daly-Lipe adds another side of Nature, the unconquerable sea, and her personal sailing experiences. As an accomplished sailor as she is a horsewoman or dog owner, she deftly paints a world of sea and sky, sun and storm, triumph and disaster. Yet all is done in an intimate and engaging manner. The volume ends with some poems extolling Nature, the subject of the book. It couldn't be done better. I recommend reading this book to all who have the slightest feeling for Life.

B. N. Peacock

    Patricia has captured the true essence of the animals in her life and animals all around us. Her unique perspective, warm heart and gentle nature shines through in this book. The short stories make reading this book enjoyable and easy.

&Tim Link, Author,
Wagging Tales: Every Animal Has a Tale

    You'll love this compelling collection of stories by Patricia Daly-Lipe! She mesmerizes you with her adventures with her beloved animals, as well as her daring voyages at sea. The stories of her pets are simply amazing. You will marvel at the connections she has with her pets. In addition, you will be reminded of the bond between humans, animals, nature and the universe. You will truly enjoy reading " Messages From Nature."

Deanie Humphrys-Dunne

            READER'S FAVORITE REVIEW
                  BOOK AWARD WINNER

   In her book “Messages from Nature,” Patricia Daly-Lipe gives her readers a collection of interesting short stories about many areas of the journey of life. She also includes a really nice tale written by her late father, which to me was a great honor to read. In this book, you will find stories about animals and the lessons we learn from them as their tale unfolds; about Adventures in the world of waters wild; the evolutionary journey with man and nature; and the last section is 'Poetic Meditations' the author has given her readers. I especially enjoyed the first section of this book with the animal stories. I was saddened by the story of Shawnara, the adorable mare that didn’t live, but what a precious animal to love! And my favorite was Woodstock, a small furry pup found on a farm in Virginia and which would have been killed had it not been for his rescue. Woodstock found his calling at being a sailor and loved the sea and sailing.
   This is just a taste of what you will read in this wonderful book by Patricia Daly-Lipe. Patricia has a wonderful way with story-telling that will draw you into the stories in a special way. You can almost feel being right there in the story with her characters. This is a wonderful fun, interesting and a really good book to read and enjoy. And if you are not a person to read long stories, well this is the book for you. The stories are short, easily read in one setting, and when you have time for another read, another great story will be waiting for you. Why not grab a copy of “Messages From Nature” to read and enjoy for yourself?

Reviewed by Joy Hannabass for Readers' Favorite

   Patricia Daly-Lipe's adventurous and loving nature shines in "Messages from Nature." A former newspaperwoman who holds a Ph.D in Creative Arts and Communications, she showcases her considerable literary talents in a well-written and appealing melange of animal and nautical tales. Who couldn't help liking Woodstock, the stray pup who was a born sailor? Or Just'n, the thoroughbred horse who Pat saved just in time, before the poor animal starved? Then, in one of the most moving stories of all, she recounts her father's tale of Jerry Too, the greyhound who loved his young owner so much he'd die rather than let him down. This is the stuff animal lovers and other readers adore.<
   But she doesn't stop there. The author includes another aspect of nature, the unconquerable sea., and her sailing experiences. As an accomplished sailor as she is a horsewoman or dog owner, she deftly paints a world of sea and sky, sun and storm, triumph and disaster. Yet all is done in an intimate and engaging manner. The volume ends with poems extolling Nature, the subject of the book. It couldn't be done better. I recommend reading this book to anyone who has the slightest feeling for Life.

B. N. Peacock,
Author; A Tainted Dawn, The Great War, Book 1

   Dear Patricia, I just finished reading your book Messages from Nature and really enjoyed your stories, especially Jerry Too (your father’s story) and the touching story of Mr. Woodstock. The ship stories are riveting! What a life you have led! My daughter would love the horse stories. Had to let you know I loved it. Thank you!

Edna Searles,
Chevy Chase Pen Women
Regent DAR, Chapter of Pleasant Plains of Damascus

   Patricia has captured the true essence of the animals in her life and animals all around us. Her unique perspective, warm heart and gentle nature shines through in this book. The short stories make reading this book enjoyable and easy.

Tim Link,
Author, Wagging Tales: Every Animal...

   You'll love this compelling collection of stories by Patricia Daly-Lipe! She mesmerizes you with her adventures with her beloved animals, as well as her daring voyages at sea. The stories of her pets are simply amazing. You will marvel at the connections she has with her pets. In addition, you will be reminded of the bond between humans, animals, nature and the universe. You will truly enjoy reading " Messages From Nature."

Deanie Humphrys-Dunne
author of: Tails of Sweetbrier, Charlie the Horse, & Charlene the Star

   I have just read "Messages From Nature" and am captivated by your work. It has been a learning experience for me in many ways. I hold more respect for my daughter's compassion as an animal rescuer. I am in awe of your navigating skills and hold newly found admiration for my young cousin, Stephanie Hart, who navigates for a Connecticut Sailing Club. Lastly, I feel your dear father's touching story sheds light on your attraction and love for animals. What a legacy.

Rita Goodgame
Little Rock, AR


  "I finished reading Messages from Nature and I really enjoyed it. Not only was it fun because I know the author, but the stories were great. I loved your father’s story of Jerry Too! Is there anything you haven’t done? The story about sailing to St. Martin was wonderful and scary; and of course we love St. Martin so it was special. You rock girl!"

dcaudill@

   "A wonderful story Patricia. And wonderful things you are doing for animals."

Joe Camp Author
Joe's best selling book, The Soul of a Horse: Life Lessons from the Herd, published by Random House/Harmony Books, follows three novels, a non-fiction inspirational book, seven produced theatrical screenplays, and the first four Benji Promise Books, for children three to seven years of age.

   How wondrous is life through the writings of Patricia Daly-Lipe. Her books Nature's Wisdom (original edition) and Messages from Nature (re-written edition) display her spiritual, respectful camaraderie with life. Her psychic partnership with animals is evident from her loving care for her pets and understanding of their timely deaths. You'll cry also over her father's heart- tugging rendition of greyhound racing. These soul-warming writings of her life's vignettes will invoke your honor of the undaunted spirit of passengers in Nature's realm. Furthermore, with her intelligent passion for life and understanding of Nature, elegant Patricia steers amazingly competently the ships in dangerous, high- rolling seas. She writes like a sailor, a scientist, an historian, and an artist, as her soul rises philosophically into the beyond.

Constance "Tina" Stonestreet Medical-Science Editor,
Ordained Minister, and Artist-Craftswoman

   This is Patricia Daly-Lipe’s gift: She tells your story – tells all of our stories – through her own experiences with beloved companions, animal and otherwise. The lean, wiry power of Daly-Lipe’s wordcraft compels you to immerse yourself in her tales, knowing full well that her tales are your tales. It is a fast read, but don’t be in a hurry; reign yourself in and savor the journey.
  When you read Messages from Nature’s (formerly Nature's Wisdom) – and read it you must – you will, by turns, smile, laugh, cheer, weep, grieve, and heal. And most of all you will rejoice at the opportunity to be invited along the diverse paths of this talented writer’s own journey in the unified company of empathy and compassion. The work chronicles Daly-Lipe’s respect – and love – for all life.
  Daly-Lipe is skilled at transferring her thoughts to her reader via creative imagery consisting of supremely well chosen words. If there is truth to Mark Twain’s observation that the difference between the right word and the almost right word is the difference between the lightning and the lightning bug, then Daly-Lipe’s prose and poetry crackle with benevolent lightning. (No offense is intended, however, toward lightning bugs.) In addition, her spare and precise writing credits us readers with being inside her, with being one with her, as she describes her experiences. She writes, for example, of Mr. Woodstock, the rescued pup from Albemarle County, Virginia, who adopts sea legs and becomes an icon aboard the author’s sailing craft. She slips the term yacht pup in on us without explanation; she knows we know what a yacht pup is and sees no need to puff the phrase up with quotation marks or italics. Oh, sure, Daly-Lipe seems to reason, not everyone yachts, but each of us has a car pup, a couch pup, a barn pup, or an office pup. She seems to know we’re with her on this one, too.
  Actually, we’re with her all the way anyway, so compassion-rich are her tales and so compelling is her manner of telling them. When you experience, through Daly-Lipe, the abundant truths waiting Out There to be harvested by the diligent and willing among us, you will be in possession of glistening gems of nature’s wisdom by their handfuls. “If we listen,” Daly-Lipe writes, “our animals will teach us more about love than most of our human friends can or will.”

Reviewed by Patti Cole, Contributing Editor to laJoie

  Dr. Pat Daly-Lipe is a highly skilled writer whose love and compassion for animals is evident throughout (this volume). Messages from Nature (formerly Nature’s Wisdom) is a joy to read and resounds with respect and honor for all life, non-human and human, a rare quality these days.

Rita Reynolds, author of Blessing the Bridge, What Animals Have to Teach Us About Death, Dying, and Beyond.
She is also co-editor and publisher of
laJoie Magazine, a quarterly publication
dedicated to promoting human appreciation for all animals.

   I was just telling Brad that you have an incredible gift for writing about animals. Everything you write gets me crying. Your deep love of animals is so clear and you have a talent for drawing the reader into the story. Brad suggested I tell you. I think you are amazing in that ability. I hope the world sees more animal-related literature from you.

Betsy Clark, Haymarket, VA

  "This is a wonderful book for all ages. If you need a great gift to give someone, what better than Messages from Nature (formerly Nature’s Wisdom)? These heart-warming stories are both entertaining and meaningful.”

Devan, age 10

   Messages from Nature (formerly Nature’s Wisdom) is a delightful collection of personal stories about animals, people, travel, and the sea. The reader quickly sees that Patricia Daly Lipe is a special person who loves animals and thoroughly understands the special bond that only animals and humans can share.
  It is also evident that she is an accomplished writer who loves travel and adventure. I particularly enjoyed her sailing recounts as I could almost feel the stillness of the too calm, quiet days and the fierceness of the stormy, windy days at sea.
  In this complex world, it is particularly refreshing to find a writer who is able to help us stop, look, reflect, and learn invaluable life lessons that only Nature can teach us. I highly recommend this book.

J. Best, North Carolina

   Messages from Nature (formerly Nature’s Wisdom) is an eclectic collection of short stories and poems, with the unusual twist of Daly-Lipe including some of her father’s works at the end of this 128 page book - His poems are particularly delightful to read!
  Following the tried-and-tested recommendation to ‘Write what you know about’, Daly-Lipe does exactly that, resulting in a patchwork quilt of light-hearted, easy-to-read autobiographical snap-shots of her travels in both the US and Europe, and the events in her life involving her pets.
  And, Daly-Lipe suggests that, “If we listen, our animals will teach us more about love than most of our human friends can or will.”
  Then, the inclusion of Daly-Lipe’s personal photos further adds to her carefully crafted words, as if any additions are needed!
  This collection will particularly appeal to pet owners, animal lovers, nature lovers and travelers. I use the word “travelers” in both the context of physical and spiritual voyages alike. Indeed, Nature’s Wisdom makes for a pleasant voyage on which to embark.

David Taub Feature columnist for Poetry Now,
Britain’s largest circulating poetry and short-story magazine.
Member of Britain’s National Union of Journalists.
Co-author of Language of Souls www.ukpoet.com

   "...you are such an inspiration to me. You write sooo beautifully and also do so with your painting."

-CC-

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4.0 out of 5 stars Memoir of the 60's, February 22, 2011
By Story Circle Book Reviews

    This review is from: All Alone: WASHINGTON to ROME, A '60s Memoir (Paperback) This is the story of a daughter looking for her connection to her family through the past. Patricia Daly-Lipe carefully chooses somebody else's words to kick off each chapter of the book. Then the reader encounters her voice through words written in her journal in the 1950's and 60's as she grows up. We meet an adolescent bewildered by family attachments based on intellectual values more than affection and expressions of love. As a result of an absent father and lack of siblings, she was quite alone when she lost her mother. Her journal pages reflect her philosophical retrospection. She longs to find "who I am and what I am supposed to do with my life." Her story is full of family history intertwined with world history. The entries from her journals about how world events are a part of her life is fascinating.
   The author shares her soul in this memoir in such a way that I found it easy to relate to her story. For those of us who grew up in the times of the Bay of Pigs and JFK and Vatican II, her memories and account of events resonate. Perhaps, I too became a seeker of truth due to the social milieu and political climate of my adolescence.
    Sadly, her family kept many secrets. At the young age of 15, her mother's doctor asked her to bear a dreadful burden by keeping her mother's cancer diagnosis a secret from her. After her mother's death, Daly-Lipe finds hints of a secret French lover in her mother's life!
    Any woman who has also had an experience in international living or studying abroad would find this narrative interesting, I believe. We find that through learning a new language and love of a new place and people, the world is brought closer together. Ultimately we are a family of humankind sharing at our roots, not just a historical past, but one heart and soul.
    I was left wondering and wanting to know more about how her relationship with her mother and father influenced her first marriage. Her story ends abruptly at the recent past, the era of raising her children. This is understandable as is so much easier to look back into the distant past than to write about present life and family members.
    Overall this little memoir is full of lessons about a life well lived and the twists and turns that we find on our life's journey.

by Martha Meacham
For Story Circle Book Reviews
reviewing books by, for, and about women

 

I thoroughly enjoyed your book though I grieved with you at the grieving parts.
Growing up in Ft. Lauderdale FL in the 50s-70s we went on many trips to Bimini/Bahamas and my dad AL SARNO, SR. worked with boat fiberglass design etc… with both Avenger and Pembroke!!! If my memory serves me right as well as Chris Craft though they were the wood design… He and my mom RUTH SARNO did yacht purveying and interior decorating in that era and later

Al Sarno, PhD, LPC, BCPC

 

5 April, 2010; A review submitted to Amazon.com
This memoir about a talented and intelligent young lady’s transition from late teen age years to young adulthood opens another world beyond the direct experience of most, including this reader.  We are taken to and from Europe where we meet individuals who place high value on ideas and philosophy, where the author describes art, architecture and ambiance, and introduces the reader to individuals of another almost (as I see it) bygone high culture.  Among others, I was intrigued by the author’s great uncle, Msgr. William A. Hemmick, the only American Canon of St. Peter’s Basilica.  I’ll say no more, but suggest one read the book.  The author uses contemporaneous diary entries coupled with the perspective of the well-educated and successful mature woman.  In this, the author succeeds.  The memoir is not in strict chronological order but arranged as one might remember long ago, which I found helpful.  The book held my attention due to the flow of the writing and my interest due to the subject matter.  The book is easily a one evening read and well worth the effort.

Donald MacLennan

ALL ALONE, From Washington to Rome, a 60s Memoir is an extraordinary memoir that immediately transports the reader to another time and place; a time when art and culture and ideas matter, and a place where beauty and love are natural and innocent. Patricia Daly-Lipe, in a style that is both literary and eloquent, paints a picture of Rome as seen by a young girl coming of age during the ‘60s and left all alone. Her bittersweet memories of the loss of her mother and a failed first love are contrasted by the unbridled joy and wonderment for life she experiences in a foreign country. All ALONE is an honest and thought provoking look into the past that offers all who read it a better understanding of themselves.

Barbara Casey, Author
Shyla’s Initiative, The House of Kane, The Coach’s Wife, Just Like Family

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There are other charming books written about the jewel-by-the-sea, La Jolla, but this one adds a special touch that enhances our beautiful resort with fascinating facts from the past. Famous names such as Irving J. Gill, the architect, Ellen Browning Scripps, Charles and Anne Lindbergh, Gregory Peck, and Cliff Robertson, to name a few. The world renowned Scripps Institute of Oceanography with its pioneers, such as Roger Revelle, is one of the many outstanding features and facts of a well written record of our paradise-on-earth village. Though not a native of La Jolla, I have visited it since 1938. I moved my residence here in 1985. I have sent this book to family and friends out of town who have also become intrigued with this Town with the Funny Name by Max Miller. Indeed, anyone, anywhere, interested in history and the arts will open a book filled with them.

Leigh Sherman, La Jolla, California;
Member of La Jolla Branch of
National League of American Pen Women since 1984

Patricia, I just have to tell you that I am still enjoying your La Jolla book....the story about the male doctor who was a woman is priceless..... and the reference to the Kelloggs really jogs my memory. I think your book is a real keeper....again, Thanks,

Caroline

  I just finished reading "La Jolla: A Celbration of Its Past" and would like to say thanks for all the hard work that you and your wife put in to that publication. It had many facts and stories previously unknown to me and lots of great photos. You did a bang up job! I highly recommend it to my LJ friends. Saludos,

Harry Marriner
La Jolla, CA

 This is the review of Patricia Daly-Lipe by Sunbelt Publications, the publisher of La Jolla, A Celebration of its Past in view of Women's History Month. March 2011

   The author of La Jolla: A Celebration of Its Past and several other literary works, Patricia was born and raised in La Jolla, CA. She left to complete her undergraduate studies at Vassar College and spent several years in Europe before returning to the United States to marry and raise children.
   Once her children were grown and she had earned a PhD in Philosophy, Patricia focused her attention on writing and painting. In 1999 her first book, Myth, Magic, & Metaphor: A Journey into the Heart of Creativity was published with one of her own paintings on the cover.
   In 1997 she returned to La Jolla and married her high school sweetheart Steele Lipe. She and Barbara Dawson (co-author of La Jolla: A Celebration of Its Past) began compiling weekly articles on “Old La Jolla” for La Jolla Village News and by 2003 La Jolla: A Celebration of Its Past was published and won a “Certificate of Excellence” from the San Diego Book Awards.
   Patricia now lives in Virginia with her husband and menagerie of dogs, horses, and cats and continues to promote her many published works at speaking events around the nation.
(References: Sunbelt Books, La Jolla: A Celebration of Its Past).

Patricia Daly-Lipe

"Genuine creative imagination does not just spring from the right hemisphere of the brain. I believe its roots come from a much deeper place: the heart" —Patricia Daly-Lipe,


 "We were lucky in La Jolla. God had been generous with its proud sentinel hills overlooking the sleepy little town, its white beaches _ some folk in less idyllic environs might have viewed us as smug _ But La Jolla was our jewel.

Cliff Robertson, actor and poet

  La Jolla is more than a town, more than just a pretty seaside place in the sun. There is a spirit about this place. The essence of La Jolla comes not only from the sea, the surf, the sun, the cliffs, and the caves, but also from its unique and bountiful history which includes very special citizens ....
  What is it about this place? To find out, at the behest of Anne Terhune, editor of La Jolla Village News, we compiled a two year series of weekly articles exploring La Jolla's rich past in honor of the Millennium. We read letters, visited libraries, searched through old books and manuscripts, listened to stories, walked around and through historical sites and discovered, by exploring the past, the many facets and facts that make this little town so special today. This book is the result of that quest.
  The authors wish to express their appreciation for the perseverance, diligence, and exactitude of Steele Lipe without whom this book would not be possible.

Thanks to Anne Terhune (editor, Beach & Bay Press) who
instigated the research which made this book possible.
 

  Winner, San Diego Books Awards, 2002
  It is my great pleasure to congratulate you for being honored by the San Diego Book Awards Association for serving as a symbol of achievement and distinction to the San Diego writing community. Your committed efforts to promote literacy have greatly benefited all of California and will positively impact future generations of both readers and writers. Congratulations and best wishes for your continued success!

Lieutenant Governor Cruz M. Bustamonte

"What a delight! The post on Tuesday brought La Jolla, A Celebration of Its Past, and I was immediately transported half a century back to a a magic time in a magic place. There are so many wonderful pictures that you can get distractedfrom seriously reading the text, but the stories are great also.
  "Getting oriented was the first task. I found Coast Boulevard, St James by the Sea where I was confirmed, La Valencia which anchored the downtown in my memories, and other spots which had faded from my recollections. Then i read the story of the Barber Tract and [a] developer's ambitious efforts to move out on the rocks. A setting just like the rocks behind our house.
  "Thank you so much for this chance to look back at La Jolla, I am enjoying it immensely and hope to talk to you about it again soon.

St. Julien R. Marshal,
Govenor of the Washington-Northern Virginia Company Jamestowne Society

  "La Jollans, young and old will appreciate the rich history in this book…. A treasure to keep in a prominent place and refer to often.

William Kellogg, President La Jolla Beach and Tennis Club

  My husband is very impressed with Patricia Daly-Lipe's book, so much so that I haven't had a chance to read it yet. He has read a number of books about our home town of La Jolla and found this one to be truly superior to the typical tourist offering. The overall quality of the book is demonstrated by the breadth of the topics covered coupled with the knowledgeable glimpses of La Jolla offered by several resident authors.

Maureen Shaner from La Jolla, California. U.S.A.

  There are other charming books written about the jewel-by-the-sea, La Jolla, but this one adds a special touch that enhances our beautiful resort with fascinating facts from the past. Famous names such as Irving J. Gill, the architect, Ellen Browning Scripps, Charles and Anne Lindbergh, Gregory Peck, and Cliff Robertson, to name a few.
The world renowned Scripps Institute of Oceanography with its pioneers, such as Roger Revelle, is one of the many outstanding features and facts of a well written record of our paradise-on-earth village.
  Though not a native of La Jolla, I have visited it since 1938. I moved my residence here in 1985.
  I have sent this book to family and friends out of town who have also become intrigued with this Town with the Funny Name by Max Miller.
  Indeed, anyone, anywhere, interested in history and the arts will open a book filled with them.

Leigh Sherman, La Jolla, California;
Member of La Jolla Branch of National League of American Pen Women since 1984:

  Our General Meeting on April 28th went splendidly. Patricia Daly-Lipe, the Author of La Jolla, A Celebration of Its Past, was so enthusiastic about her subject that she had us all amazed! Her husband, Steele Lipe who edited her book, came along to encourage her for she had two talks scheduled that daya long day for her but she rose to the occasion with gusto. It is beautiful now, but we can only imagine it unspoiled by traffic and congestion. A good read! Patricia had written several books and has a novel coming up this year.

Barbara DeYoung
Lakeside, California Historical Society
April 28th General Meeting 2003

  "Add blessings on you both for creating such an informative and delightful book on La Jolla... (It) kept me up late last night .... Thank you for writing this literary treasure!"

Janie Paull past resident of La Jolla, California. U.S.A.

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